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Ortgies Semi-Automatic Pistol

ManInBlack

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
1,552
Location
SW Idaho
Hello all. Looking for any advice folks care to offer.

I have an opportunity to buy a later-model Ortgies pistol (made by Deutsche Werke) in .25 ACP/6.35mm for $175. From looking around at similar pistols, that seems to be a good price (others in good condition sell for anywhere between $250-$400). When I called the gentleman selling it, I commented on how much of the bluing was left, and he said he had "touched it up."

I plan on taking a look at it tomorrow, and will probably buy it either way. I have been looking for a small pistol to play around with for awhile, and I like that the Ortgies has some character and history to it. Everything I have read suggests it is a reliable, well-made gun. I'm not hugely concerned about the collector value, but it would be nice to get a good deal here. If the bluing has truly only been "touched up," as he said, how much of the collector value would that destroy?

I figure gun prices will continue to rise regardless of whether Hussein or the flopper wins the White House.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ortgies_Semi-Automatic_Pistol
The Ortgies 7.65 mm pistol was a hammerless semi-automatic pistol produced in Germany in the years immediately after World War I, first by its inventor Heinrich Ortgies and then by Deutsche Werke. Inexpensive but of good quality, the pistol achieved considerable success at contemporary shooting competitions[SUP][1][/SUP] and, as an export product, was popular in North, Central, and South America.[SUP][2]

[/SUP]The pistol was produced in 6.35 mm, 7.65 mm, and 9 mm variants. Although not expensive, at the time it was of advanced design and high quality construction with relatively few parts, well sealed against dirt. Metal components were forged or machined, and assembly in general made no use of screws, even securing the wooden grips with metal clips, although some examples do incorporate a single screw for that purpose. The hammerless action depended on a spring-loaded striker to fire the cartridge. As in early Colt and Browning pocket pistols, the Ortgies striker also operated as an ejector as the slide traveled backwards after discharge.[SUP][1][/SUP]
 
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ManInBlack

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
1,552
Location
SW Idaho
Well, I went ahead and bought it. It was a little more scuffed up than his pictures indicated, and had "Germany" stamped into the slide (indicating it was produced for export, and hence of lower value). I offered him $140, and he took $150. I figure I'd pay about that much for a typical "economy gun" like a Phoenix, Jimenez, Jennings, etc., which likely wouldn't be the same quality or have the history.

It's a neat little piece. It only has a grip safety (which, once depressed, does not pop back out, and must be reset with a button by the user to make the gun safe again). I opened her up and noted that the inner mechanisms all appeared to be in good working order. Something interesting about the gun is that it is constructed without the use of any screws.

I hope to shoot it either today or tomorrow and will let you all know how it goes. Supposedly, they are quite accurate (fingers crossed).
 

Brian D.

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2007
Messages
931
Location
Cincy area, Ohio, USA
Those are WAY more commonly found in .25 and .32 than the "9mm"--which means .380 acp in this case--version. From what I've seen the firing pins have a rather annoying tendency to break, they seem to be kinda brittle considering what they're made to do. However a good hobby machinist or gunsmith could fashion a replacement if..eh, when..needed.

Also I don't think they're particularly drop safe, as memory serves from looking at the innards of them it wouldn't be advisable to carry one with the chamber loaded.

As to accuracy, well not bad given the tiny sights so common from that era.
 

ManInBlack

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
1,552
Location
SW Idaho
Those are WAY more commonly found in .25 and .32 than the "9mm"--which means .380 acp in this case--version. From what I've seen the firing pins have a rather annoying tendency to break, they seem to be kinda brittle considering what they're made to do. However a good hobby machinist or gunsmith could fashion a replacement if..eh, when..needed.

I've heard the same thing about the firing pin, and that one should not dry fire it without snap caps. I was actually surprised out how easy it is to get replacement parts for the gun - Midway, Numrich, etc. carry them.

Also I don't think they're particularly drop safe, as memory serves from looking at the innards of them it wouldn't be advisable to carry one with the chamber loaded.

I really don't know about the drop safety (planning not to drop it) but I really don't think it would be dangerous to carry fully loaded in a proper holster.

As to accuracy, well not bad given the tiny sights so common from that era.

Yes, the sights are small, but if one was drawing from a vest or coat pocket, which was the primary purpose, he certainly wouldn't want the sights to snag. In any event, many self-defense engagements are point-and-shoot affairs.
 
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