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If a LE resigns from an organizational assignment...are they still employed?

solus

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Every member of a police crowd-control unit in the US city of Portland has resigned after one of its officers was indicted on an assault charge.

Earlier this week, a grand jury decided to indict Portland police officer Corey Budworth with one count of fourth-degree assault - the first RTT member to face criminal prosecution stemming from the protests.

Video of the incident purportedly shows an officer using his baton to push a woman to the ground and then pushing the baton into her face, the New York Times reported.


so 50 officers resign from a duty, allegedly a "VOLUNTARY" organizational duty...why are those officers still considered employed?
 

deanf

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What are you driving at? It's common for large public safety agencies to have special units. Many such units are considered "plum" assignments, and come with certain privileges and usually extra pay. I see no reason why someone resigning from a special unit or assignment should terminate their compete employment.
 

solus

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What are you driving at? It's common for large public safety agencies to have special units. Many such units are considered "plum" assignments, and come with certain privileges and usually extra pay. I see no reason why someone resigning from a special unit or assignment should terminate their compete employment.

And if the entire 50 members of a special unit within the sheriff's deputies, or fire department, or ems, or national guard, or armed forces, or suppose individuals within the federal agencies did the same thing...

sorry, whatever the rationale these members took the department's assignment, e.g., pay, recognition, ad nausea, they have committed insubordination and left a void in their agency 'To Serve & Protect' their community.

"IF" the team making up the Serving warrants resigned their posts, or perhaps those comprising the swat team protecting those serving/accomplishing "No knock" warrants...?

PORTLAND is in at will state and these individuals have given just cause for dismissal!
 

deanf

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Kalm down Karen. More likely than not, the assignment was voluntary. Resigning from a voluntary assignment is not insubordination. And even if it was, the department's procedures for progressive discipline probably don't allow for dismissal for the first offense, depending on the circumstances. You should probably just delete your original post.
 

solus

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Kalm down Karen. More likely than not, the assignment was voluntary. Resigning from a voluntary assignment is not insubordination. And even if it was, the department's procedures for progressive discipline probably don't allow for dismissal for the first offense, depending on the circumstances. You should probably just delete your original post.

Nice out of the blue behaviour shown - - childish degrading name calling...
 

color of law

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Firearms Iinstuctor

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VOLUNTARY"

That is the key word if one volunteers for extra duty.

Then one can stop volunteering.

Officers do it all the time for many reasons. What once was a good idea is no longer in a officers career.

Could be as simple has they got married had a child or any other reason they can't or doesn't want to put in the extra time or effort into the specially he volunteered for.
 

mlawson

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Wouldn't that be the same thing as stepping down from foot patrol to pencil pushing desk jockey? Still employed, but changed 'departments'.
 

color of law

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VOLUNTARY"

That is the key word if one volunteers for extra duty.

Then one can stop volunteering.

Officers do it all the time for many reasons. What once was a good idea is no longer in a officers career.

Could be as simple has they got married had a child or any other reason they can't or doesn't want to put in the extra time or effort into the specially he volunteered for.
Most of these "teams" or "special assignments" are voluntary. Employees comings and goings is not unusual from these voluntary positions for a prolifera of reasons. But when ALL the volunteers "quit" to protest a possible crime within their ranks, this could be easily viewed as insubornation, effecting public safety.

It is up to the agency to determine how they wish to deal with the problem. You or my opinion plus 5 dollars and 65 cents will get you a cup of coffee.
 

American Patriot

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A volunteer is just that, "a volunteer," and cannot be forced to work, he/she is a volunteer. Privileges come with the position. Wife and I have been volunteers for the past 50 years. A volunteer is "Good for nothing."
 

JTHunter2

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From what I have read on various feeds, the "response team" from which these officers resigned was a "voluntary team". They have not left the force and they will still be doing much the same work as the rapid response team did before. They just won't have access to the "special tools" (shields, chemicals, armor, etc.) they had as "the team".
 

solus

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So your fellow tean officers stand in unity & resign signifying their "condoning" another team member's alleged violent & inappropriate action(s), as decided & pursued by the elected judicial system, towards a citizen!

kinda like the Floyd incident where three by-standing LEs personally witness a fellow officer mistreat, ending the suspect passing, all the while the suspect was held under LE's knee for approx 11 min, without stepping forward in any shape or way to stop the flagrant abuse and violation of agency policy(ies)!
 
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solus

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9 Minutes and 29 Seconds
Not to be au contraire mon ami, per LA Times [AP], quote:
Minnesota prosecutors acknowledged Wednesday that a Minneapolis police officer had his knee on the neck of George Floyd for 7 minutes, 46 seconds — not the 8:46 that has become a symbol of police brutality — but said the one-minute error would have no impact on the criminal case against four officers. Unquote.

 

American Patriot

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Not to be au contraire mon ami, per LA Times [AP], quote:
Minnesota prosecutors acknowledged Wednesday that a Minneapolis police officer had his knee on the neck of George Floyd for 7 minutes, 46 seconds — not the 8:46 that has become a symbol of police brutality — but said the one-minute error would have no impact on the criminal case against four officers. Unquote.



Prosecutors say Derek Chauvin knelt on George Floyd for 9 minutes 29 seconds, longer than initially reported.​


March 30, 2021, 10:24 a.m. ETMarch 30, 2021
March 30, 2021
By Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs

The length of time that Derek Chauvin was initially said to have knelt on George Floyd’s neck — eight minutes 46 seconds — was put on masks, shirts and signs and became a rallying cry for months at protests in Minneapolis and across the United States.

But the actual time was even longer — nine minutes 29 seconds — a prosecutor noted in court on Monday during the opening statements in the murder trial of Mr. Chauvin.

“The most important numbers you will hear in this trial are nine, two, nine,” Jerry W. Blackwell, one of the prosecutors, said in his opening statement. “What happened in those nine minutes and 29 seconds when Mr. Derek Chauvin was applying this excess force to the body of Mr. George Floyd.”

Shortly after Mr. Floyd’s death on May 25, prosecutors in Hennepin County indicated the length of time was eight minutes 46 seconds. Then, in June, they revised that time downward, to seven minutes 46 seconds,
 
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